reflections what wildlife needs

Reflections is a book on what wildlife needs, and how to provide it. Marc Avery reflects on our relationship with wildlife and conservation, from cats that pass through his garden to decline of farmland wildlife and pasqueflowers he visits each spring. Everything is connected and considered. It’s time to role out conservation on a bigger scale. Also read how to help your local wildlife rescue.

A timely brutally honest yet inspiring account on what has gone wrong with wildlife conservation, and how we can put it right. Stephen Moss 

If I were ‘king for a day’, Avery would be instantly installed as the benign dictator of conservation. If you love wildlife – read this, think about this, and act upon this. Chris Packham 

Urban Jungle explores the wild side of modern-day cities. Nature has always been at the heart of every city from abandoned sites to strips of land alongside railway lines (often mistaken for rivers by wildfowl in heavy rain). Today, natural forces (floods, storms, droughts and pandemics) look set to determine the future, so whereas we used to build walls and towers to defend against attack – today we have to become greener, to protect ourselves (and wildlife) from external threats.

Cities are not all humans and rats! All urban areas have opportunistic foxes (which have lost natural habitats – they eat rabbits and rats in nature) and endangered stag beetles (those big grubs you find in the soil are babies, so leave them alone).

explore the native wildlife of London city

London in the wild

London in the Wild is a wonderful guide by London Wildlife Trust to creatures hiding beyond concrete, lights, noise and pollution. And of course, London pigeons! Discover a city teeming with over 15,000 species of flora, fungi and fauna (marsh frogs, hedgehogs, short-eared owls and dragonflies). Not just gardens and parks, London has wetlands (one’s in Hackney), woodlands and heaths. And learn about the day-to-day life of a London tube mouse!

Cities are not all humans and rats! All urban areas have opportunistic foxes (which have lost natural habitats – they eat rabbits and rats in nature) and endangered stag beetles (those big grubs you find in the soil are babies, so leave them alone). Reducing light pollution and glass buildings (especially lit) can help local wildlife and stop birds flying into windows. In case of help needed, find your local wildlife rescue and visit London Wildlife Protection.

Whether you live there or are visiting, get yourself a copy of the London National Park Map. This essential resource for nature enthusiasts lists all the parks, woodlands, playing fields, national nature reserves, rivers and lakes that contribute to London’s green space. Includes walks like the London Loop and Capital Ring, with symbols on where to swim outdoors, climb peaks, pitch a tent or go sailing! This massive map is single-sided, so good for pinning on a wall. London Wildlife Trust is a driving force for nature conservation across the capital, with supporters and volunteers who work to protect wildlife everywhere through practical conservation work.

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